What is it?
  • Navigate your way from start to finish at an average speed
  • Events usually take place at night on public roads
  • ££
  • human person
  • U18
  • DRv Lic24
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5

Reasons we think you will love it!

1

You can use your own road car

2

It’s all about being on time

3

Lots of different event types

4

A mixture of road and off-road sections

5

Share the event with a friend or family member as a navigator

get started in 3 easy steps

Touring Assembly

Primarily social events, Touring Assemblies are a non-competitive form of Rallying and a great way to get a taste of rallying. Designed as fun for the whole family, you can have children as young as two years old as rear passengers.

The role of the co-driver is to navigate your driver along a pre-determined, often scenic, route on public roads. Directions are provided ahead of time, and speeds rarely exceed 30mph. Often, there are one or two refreshment stops, where you can socialise with other enthusiasts.

Depending on the club, Touring Assemblies are often organised for historic cars, or particular makes or models, but others may be eligible.

For more information, check out the Rallying page on the Motorsport UK StreetCar website on the link below.

Get Started

To find out more about Road Rallying, check out the video below:

Treasure Hunt

Treasure Hunts are fun, social events. Teams are made up of driver and navigator, but additional passengers are often permitted.

You’ll be given a set of clues, or a list of items to collect, at the start of the event and it is your job as the navigators to plan the route you will take to reach the various plot points necessary within the time limit.

Both Treasure Hunts and Navigational Scatters are excellent entry points to learning the techniques of navigation and starting to build the teamwork that is needed between driver and navigator.

Routes are often on public roads, with speeds rarely exceeding 30mph. Events usually start in car parks and finish at a place of interest or refreshment, picking up clues and treasure along the way.

For more information, check out the Rallying page on the Motorsport UK StreetCar website on the link below.

Get Started

To find out more about Road Rallying, check out the video below:

Navigational Scatter

A great entry point into rallying, a Navigational Scatter is a fantastic opportunity to build the skills necessary in more complex formats. Teams, each made up of a driver and a navigator, are given around 20 – 30 plot points scattered across a defined area, with a clue or question to solve at each point (the number on a particular telegraph pole, for example).

Your role as the navigator is to plot the points and choose the route you’ll take to ensure maximum points in the time limit. Think of a navigational scatter as one step up from a Treasure Hunt.

Navigational Scatters usually take place in the evening or at night, along public roads, with speeds rarely exceeding 30mph.

For more information, check out the Rallying page on the Motorsport UK StreetCar website on the link below.

Get Started

To find out more about Road Rallying, check out the video below:

12 Car Rally

A 12 Car Rally, perhaps unsurprisingly, is a rally featuring 12 cars.  Competitors participate in teams of two, a driver and a navigator.

Multitasking is key if you wish to navigate on a 12 Car. You have to direct the driver along a route, ensuring you’re visiting check points and time controls in the right order, all while maintaining a time schedule.

The difference between this and other forms of rallying is that you are given a series of instructions defining your route, visiting the plot points in order and at particular times. At each point, there will be a marshal waiting to note your time and to provide the next set of instructions. The objective is to navigate to each time control accurately while following a time schedule.

A 12 Car Rally takes place on public roads, with speeds rarely exceeding 30mph.

It is recommended to start out with a navigational scatter or treasure hunt before attempting a 12 Car Rally.

For more information, check out the Rallying page on the Motorsport UK StreetCar website on the link below.

Get Started

To find out more about Road Rallying, check out the video below:

Navigational Rally

A Navigational Rally takes place in the evening or at night and involves navigating to a number of different plot points in the designated area.

As the navigator you’ll be given a series of instructions defining the route and must direct the driver to ensure you visit the plot points in order and at the correct time. At each point, there will be a marshal waiting to note the time of arrival and to provide the next set of instructions.

You’ll need a strong stomach and to be good at multitasking to be able to plot on-the-go!

Like most road rallies, a Navigational Rally takes place on public roads, with speeds rarely exceeding 30mph. The aim is to complete the course accurately, in the best time possible.

For more information, check out the Rallying page on the Motorsport UK StreetCar website on the link below.

Get Started

To find out more about Road Rallying, check out the video below:

Targa Rally

A cross between a Rally and an Autotest, a Targa consists of a course marked out by cones, with a set route and a navigator to direct. The aim is to follow the correct route, in the quickest time possible.

Targa Rallies are usually held during the daytime, on private land, with plenty of tight turns to keep speeds low. Some events may use multiple venues, navigating on public roads between locations.

At single venue Targa Rallies, you may share your car, taking it in turns to act as driver or navigator. Teamwork is key!

For more information, check out the Rallying page on the Motorsport UK StreetCar website on the link below.

Get Started

To find out more about Road Rallying, check out the video below:

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